Collaborative to Advance Equity Through Research Members Respond to Executive Order

On Friday, January 27, 2017, President Donald Trump signed an executive order barring entry to the United States for all refugees and citizens from seven countries with majority Muslim populations.

The Collaborative to Advance Equity Through Research is a national coalition of institutions committed to supporting and advancing research addressing the lives of women and girls of color. This Collaborative serves as a national model of substantive action, best practices, and sustained partnerships to advance equity through research about women and girls of color.

Below are responses issued by Collaborative members to President Trump’s executive order:

American Association of University Women
Keeping in line with our history as an organization, AAUW will not be silent in the face of bias and bigotry today. Our unique voice is needed now more than ever.

Black Youth Project of the University of Chicago
University of Chicago President Robert J. Zimmer and Provost Daniel Diermeier: “As the leaders of one of the country’s great institutions of higher education and research, we are writing to assert in the strongest possible terms the importance to the United States of continuing to welcome immigrants and the talent and energy that they bring to this country. The history of scientific and technological advance that undergirds all of the economic growth the country has witnessed for decades, as well as the position of the country as the greatest magnet for talented people from around the world, has depended upon this welcoming stance. A failure to maintain this position will ultimately weaken the nation’s world-leading higher education institutions, diminish the innovation energy in the country, slow the pace of technology development, and ultimately weaken the nation.”

Brown University
President Christina Paxson: “Brown has made its position on the Executive Order crystal clear: that it runs counter to our commitment to free inquiry and the advancement of knowledge; it is antithetical in letter and spirit to our insistence that individual students and scholars should be free to pursue their scholarship and learning without fear of intimidation or discrimination of any kind; and it contradicts our unconditional rejection of every form of bigotry, discrimination, xenophobia and harassment. I firmly believe that education and knowledge creation are global public goods. Our charge as a leading university is to engage fully in the world, bringing the most talented faculty and students to Brown without regard to nationality or religion. The Executive Order runs counter to American traditions and values and restricts the ability of Brown and other institutions of higher education to fulfill their missions.”

University of California – Berkeley
President Janet Napolitano and the Chancellors of the University of California: “While maintaining the security of the nation’s visa system is critical, this executive order is contrary to the values we hold dear as leaders of the University of California. The UC community, like universities across the country, has long been deeply enriched by students, faculty, and scholars from around the world, including the affected countries, coming to study, teach, and research. It is critical that the United States continues to welcome the best students, scholars, scientists, and engineers of all backgrounds and nationalities. We are committed to supporting all members of the UC community who are impacted by this executive action.”

University of California – Los Angeles Black Male Institute
UCLA Chancellor Gene D. Block and Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost Scott L. Waugh: “The executive order directly challenges the core values and mission of universities to encourage the free exchange of scholars, knowledge and ideas. It may affect the ability to travel for thousands of students and scholars now in the US diligently pursuing their scholarly careers as well as countless others who wish to take advantage of our open universities to pursue knowledge and truth. Although the breadth of the Order is not yet clear, it also could adversely affect the ability to travel for many faculty, students, and staff in our own community. As your Chancellor and Executive Vice Chancellor, we want to reassure the campus community as a whole and especially those directly affected by this order that the University of California and our campus’s leadership stand by our core values. We are actively engaged with the UC Office of the President to understand the full implications of the order and to find ways of protecting members of our community. The integrity of our mission as a research university and the well-being of our campus’ community are paramount.”

Center for American Women and Politics, Eagleton Institute of Politics, Rutgers University
Rutgers University President Robert Barchi: “Academia is by its nature international, and we must be vigilant to protect and advocate for the free exchange of ideas around the world. I firmly believe that our community’s actions in November helped to protect undocumented students, and I hope that by this evening’s show of solidarity, we will have a similar impact on national conversations about immigration and refugee rights.We are sensitive to the particularly chilling impact this executive order has had on many in our Muslim community at Rutgers, which is one of the largest in American higher education and which is so integral to our diverse and inclusive university. Despite claims to the contrary, this order appears to unduly target Muslims and to prey upon unfounded fears. Cultural and ethnic diversity is an essential element of our identity and a particular strength of Rutgers as a public research university. We value the contributions that all our students, from every background and place of birth, make to the richness of our academic community. Nothing about the recent executive order changes Rutgers’ policy affirming our students’ right to privacy and safety. We remain steadfast in our commitment to protect the privacy of our student records and to provide a safe place for our entire community. We would apply these same principles to any future calls for mandatory student registration based on ethnicity or religion. I urge you to join me in working with our Senators and Representatives in Congress to push back on immigration policies—and, indeed, all policies—that are counter to the spirit and vitality of higher education and research.”

Center for Medicine, Health, and Society at Vanderbilt University
Vanderbilt University Chancellor Nicholas Zeppos: “Vanderbilt University is home to students, faculty and staff from all over the world, including the countries that have been identified by the recent Executive Order issued on Friday, Jan. 27, 2017. This order could have a direct adverse impact on members of our community and will significantly limit our ability to recruit the very best and talented individuals from around the world. Our mission, as well as the nation’s security, competitiveness, research primacy, and innovation leadership depend greatly on this diverse global community. Vanderbilt thrives when it is global, diverse and inclusive. We are constant in committing ourselves to these values”

Colorado Women’s College at the University of Denver
University of Denver President Rebecca Chopp: “The University of Denver will continue to uphold our values in support of our mission. We endorse immigration policies that are thoughtful and sensitive and which allow our nation, including colleges and universities, to benefit from the talents, perspectives and passions of students and scholars worldwide. To waver in our support would be a detriment to our mission and a compromise of the values we hold dear. we know that our learning environments are weakened when scholars, students and staff feel threatened or afraid. This University—and this country—have long benefited from immigrants who have contributed to our ability to innovate, create and discover. Josef Korbel, for example, came to the United States under political asylum, before coming to teach at DU and found the school of international studies that would later come to bear his name. We are committed to providing the supports needed for our community members to know that they belong here and that they are deeply valued.”

Columbia University
President Lee C. Bollinger: “At a more fundamental level, this order undermines the nation’s continuing commitment to remain open to the exchange of people and ideas. We must not underestimate the scale of its impact. An estimated 17,000 international students in the U.S. are from the seven nations covered by the entry ban. If this order stands, there is the certainty of a profound impact on our University community, which is committed to welcoming students, faculty, and staff from around the world, as well as across the nation.As I have said on many occasions, it is critically important that the University, as such, not take stands on ideological or political issues. Yet it is also true that the University, as an institution in the society, must step forward to object when policies and state action conflict with its fundamental values, and especially when they bespeak purposes and a mentality that are at odds with our basic mission. This is such a case. It is important to remind ourselves that the United States has not, except in episodes of national shame, excluded individuals from elsewhere in the world because of their religious or political beliefs. We have learned that generalized fears of threats to our security do not justify exceptions to our founding ideals. There are many powerful and self-evident reasons not to abandon these core values, but among them is the fact that invidious discrimination often adds fuel to deeply harmful stereotypes and hostility affecting our own citizens.”

University of Connecticut
President Susan Herbst: “The University of Connecticut is a community of scholars that is home to students, faculty, and staff from across the nation and the globe. Our large and diverse population – including our international students – is one of our greatest strengths as a top research university. Our diversity is indeed central to the rich nature of campus life and the excellent education we offer. As we have often said, UConn is committed to supporting every member of our community. In keeping with that commitment, in December, I shared all that UConn is currently doing with respect to our population of undocumented students in the face of changes in federal policy. Following Friday’s executive order, I have asked our Vice President for Global Affairs, Daniel Weiner, to assemble a working group to determine what the implications of this order are for our international students and faculty, and offer them as much information and guidance as we are able to during this uncertain time.”

Duke University
President Richard Brodhead and Provost Sally Kornbluth: “Duke University is committed to, and is greatly enriched by, the open exchange of students, scholars and ideas from all over the globe. We are deeply concerned about the well-being of students, faculty and staff who may be impacted by the policies that have now been put in place, and will join with the rest of higher education to bring these concerns to the attention of policymakers and the public. To that end, we want to restate our fundamental commitment to ensuring that all students and faculty can focus on what brought them here in the first place: to get a world-class education and pursue scholarship in an environment that supports them regardless of their background. While the current environment remains unsettled, we want to restate (see https://today.duke.edu/2016/12/message-president-brodhead-immigration-issues) that Duke University cannot and will not share confidential student records with law enforcement agencies—local, state, or federal—without a subpoena.”

Hutchins Center for African & African American Research, Harvard University
Harvard University President Drew Faust: “As I write, we are still working to understand the concrete implications of the new travel restrictions, and we are following related developments in the courts. But the disruption and disorientation flowing from these restrictions are palpable and distressing. While questions may at this point be far more apparent than answers, the restrictions are already posing barriers to scholars and students seeking to enter the country and are inhibiting others from pursuing important travel abroad, fearful about their ability to return. Amid this widespread doubt and unease, we will continue to insist that policymakers take full account of how fundamentally our universities depend on the ability of people to travel across borders without undue constraint. National security is, of course, an essential element of our nation’s immigration policy. But we are confident those considerations can be fairly addressed while avoiding the large-scale disruption and distress that the new restrictions portend—and while honoring the ideals of openness, nondiscrimination, and opportunity that our universities and our nation hold dear. We urge the administration, the Congress, and the courts to address these concerns without delay.”

Marquette University
President Michael R. Lovell, Provost Daniel J. Myers, Vice President for Mission and Ministry Rev. Tom Krettek, S.J., and Student Government President Adam Kouhel: “We are steadfast in our commitment to serve all as a welcoming learning community that is open to people from a wide variety of backgrounds, perspectives and national origins. Let’s remember the larger American story. We are a nation of immigrants. Pope Francis reminds us to focus on building bridges. Our doors will always be open to everyone, and we will do everything in our power for that to remain the case.”

University of Massachusetts Amherst
Chancellor Kumble Subbaswamy: “Our international faculty, students and staff are deeply valued members of the UMass Amherst community. As we grapple with many fundamental questions that go to the heart of our ideals as Americans and our role in the world, I want to make clear that we will do everything within our legal and moral authority to protect our community members, no matter their national origin, race, religion, socioeconomic status, sexual identity or immigration status.”

University of Minnesota
President Eric W. Kaler: “This University will support members of our community adversely affected by the executive order. We will advocate for you. You are entitled to be treated with justice and dignity, and the University of Minnesota stands with you.”

National Women’s Law Center
Senior Vice President for Programs Fatima Goss Graves: “President Donald Trump’s ban on immigration and detention of refugees and other visitors from countries with a majority Muslim population, some reportedly without access to legal counsel, is an outrageous violation of human rights and civil rights. Criminalizing people because of their faith or country of origin violates the law and American values. In separating families and sowing fear and confusion in our communities, Trump is undermining the fabric of our country and making us less safe. These actions are deplorable and must not stand.”

Newcomb College Institute of Tulane University
Tulane University President Michael Fitts: “From its founding in 1834, Tulane has always been a profoundly global institution looking outward to solve the world’s problems. While we stand ready to enter into respectful debate with others, Tulane will never cease to defend the principles of non-discrimination, mutual respect and open inquiry upon which our university, our country and the international community of scholars are built.”

New York University College of Global Public Health
New York University President Andrew Hamilton: “As a scientist who studied and worked in four countries before becoming a citizen of the U.S., I know how important it is to be able to move across borders in peaceful pursuit of one’s scholarship. I know, too, more than most given my background and my field, how much goodwill the U.S. earns for itself through the openness of its education system and how widely those who study here can spread American values. And I know, as well, that these developments are not just a matter of disrupted educational plans or lost opportunities or even damage to the academic enterprise; beyond all that, this order harms one of the most admired and cherished of American principles — religious non-discrimination itself.”

North Carolina State University
Chancellor Randy Woodson: “At NC State, across the UNC System and throughout the United States, our international students, faculty and staff are critically important and extremely valuable members of our higher education communities. Our universities are daily enriched and strengthened by the talent, insight and culture that international students, faculty and staff bring to our campuses.”

The Ohio State University
President Michael Drake: “We are committed to protecting the information of all of our students, regardless of immigration status. The university’s established and consistently applied policies hold that we do not release personal data to third parties except as required by law. We admit students without regard to race, religion, national origin or immigration status, and undocumented students are entitled to all of the rights and privileges of other students at Ohio State. Ohio State remains engaged on this important issue with elected officials and national higher education organizations. While we acknowledge the importance of appropriate visa standards, we are very concerned about the broad implications of this new executive order.”

University of Pittsburgh
Chancellor Patrick Gallagher: “I am deeply troubled by this executive action. I join others in the academic world who are condemning this executive order and calling for a sensible immigration policy that protects national security without discriminating against individuals and without incurring potential and profound harm to our nation’s system of higher education.”

Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University
Harvard University President Drew Faust: “As I write, we are still working to understand the concrete implications of the new travel restrictions, and we are following related developments in the courts. But the disruption and disorientation flowing from these restrictions are palpable and distressing. While questions may at this point be far more apparent than answers, the restrictions are already posing barriers to scholars and students seeking to enter the country and are inhibiting others from pursuing important travel abroad, fearful about their ability to return. Amid this widespread doubt and unease, we will continue to insist that policymakers take full account of how fundamentally our universities depend on the ability of people to travel across borders without undue constraint. National security is, of course, an essential element of our nation’s immigration policy. But we are confident those considerations can be fairly addressed while avoiding the large-scale disruption and distress that the new restrictions portend—and while honoring the ideals of openness, nondiscrimination, and opportunity that our universities and our nation hold dear. We urge the administration, the Congress, and the courts to address these concerns without delay.”

Rutgers University – Camden
Rutgers University President Robert Barchi: “Academia is by its nature international, and we must be vigilant to protect and advocate for the free exchange of ideas around the world. I firmly believe that our community’s actions in November helped to protect undocumented students, and I hope that by this evening’s show of solidarity, we will have a similar impact on national conversations about immigration and refugee rights.We are sensitive to the particularly chilling impact this executive order has had on many in our Muslim community at Rutgers, which is one of the largest in American higher education and which is so integral to our diverse and inclusive university. Despite claims to the contrary, this order appears to unduly target Muslims and to prey upon unfounded fears. Cultural and ethnic diversity is an essential element of our identity and a particular strength of Rutgers as a public research university. We value the contributions that all our students, from every background and place of birth, make to the richness of our academic community. Nothing about the recent executive order changes Rutgers’ policy affirming our students’ right to privacy and safety. We remain steadfast in our commitment to protect the privacy of our student records and to provide a safe place for our entire community. We would apply these same principles to any future calls for mandatory student registration based on ethnicity or religion. I urge you to join me in working with our Senators and Representatives in Congress to push back on immigration policies—and, indeed, all policies—that are counter to the spirit and vitality of higher education and research.”

The Seminar on Public Engagement and Collaborative Research, Center for the Humanities, CUNY Graduate Center
CUNY Graduate Center President Chase F. Robinson and Provost Joy Connolly: “This critical moment affords us the opportunity to re-affirm our values as academics. Like every other institution committed to the advancement and exchange of ideas, the Graduate Center draws its strength from the circulation of knowledge, scholars and students across the globe. The ban runs counter to who we are and what we do. While we work to support Saira and those in our community who may be at risk, rest assured that we will also guarantee academic principles that are consistent with our deepest human values.”

Thurgood Marshall Institute at the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, Inc.
“The NAACP Legal Defense Fund, Inc. (LDF) stands firm in our belief that any policy that discriminates on the basis of race, national origin, or religious belief is an affront to our Constitution and who we are as a nation. Today’s executive order targeting Syrians and other Muslims harkens back to some of the most shameful moments in our history which resulted in the deaths of countless men, women, and children fleeing war and persecution. As LDF Founder Thurgood Marshall so aptly observed regarding the exclusion of American citizens of Japanese origin during World War II: “Yet we unquestionably invite disaster if there are times when it is considered permissible to ignore or thrust aside constitutional guarantees and prohibitions.”

Tufts University
Dean of Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy Admiral James Stavridis: “There are hard calls, and I respect the challenges faced by the president and his team as they try to wrestle with them. But this set of executive orders stands in violation of international and treaty law, is poor policy, and fails the common sense check. It hurts us a nation, and places us on the wrong side of our principles. Let’s admit we are on the wrong course, and adjust accordingly before more damage is done.”

University of Virginia
President Teresa Sullivan and Executive Vice President and Provost Tom Katsouleas: “Beyond our concern for individual students, faculty, and staff at UVA who are affected by the executive order, we are concerned about the larger effect this and related actions may have on American universities, including UVA, as we seek to expose students to international experiences. Being a great university in the 21st century means being a global university, and our entire University community is enriched and enlightened by interacting with teachers and students from other nations. Providing these experiences is an investment in the future as we seek to build international cooperation and peace. Higher education leaders around the world continue to emulate America’s colleges and universities because of the excellence we have achieved in teaching, research, and innovation, and an essential element of that excellence is our openness to people from other nations. Our University continues to enunciate values that support the bedrock principles of individual freedom, including freedom of expression and freedom of religion.”

Virginia Tech
President Tim Sands: “Virginia Tech is a global land-grant university. Whether it is research supporting the development of agricultural products for export, or attracting global talent to the commonwealth to drive our technology-based economy, or providing our Virginia students with opportunities to engage with the full range of lived experiences represented by our 3,500 international students, our missions are inexorably global in nature. Consistent with our Principles of Community, we will continue to do all that we can to support and advocate for the international members of our community who are vital to our mission. They are welcomed and cherished members of our community, regardless of immigration status, national origin, religion, or citizenship.”

Wake Forest University
President Nathan Natch: “I deeply empathize with all of you concerned for your personal safety and the security of your family. I reaffirm my commitment to do everything within my power as the president of Wake Forest University to support every member of our community in their pursuit of an education.”

Winston-Salem State University
University of North Carolina General Administration: “The university’s international students, distinguished researchers, and faculty are valued and important members of our university community. While the exact impact of the Executive Order (EO) on our university community remains unclear, we have asked each of our constituent institutions to advise their students and employees who are nationals of the countries identified in the EO to refrain from traveling outside the country. We are continuing to monitor the situation, and we will keep our campus communities apprised of new information as it becomes available.”

YWCA USA
“YWCA USA condemns all forms of racism, including xenophobia and anti-immigrant sentiment. We cannot allow our leaders to further institutionalize racism through public policy. An immigration ban, a constructed wall, or other limitations and policies based on an individuals’ nationality or religion, is bad policy and not a reflection of American values. YWCA will continue to speak out against inequity and work to foster peace, justice, freedom, and dignity for all.”